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"Recorder" with Matt Wolf and Lynne Tillman

Friday November 15 8:00PM

Q&A with Matt Wolf, moderated by Lynne Tillman, following the 8pm screening on Friday, 11/8.

For thirty years, Marion Stokes, the African American left-wing activist and archivist, secretly recorded television 24 hours a day. Her project began with the Iran Hostage Crisis and ended upon her death some 70,000 tapes later. Capturing revolutions, wars, triumphs, catastrophes, bloopers, talk shows and commercials that show us how television shaped the world of today, the Philadelphia-based Stokes’s stated intention was to protect the truth while the television networks were carelessly throwing away their own archives. Packed with unexpected twists and unbelievable footage, director Matt Wolf’s film is a sensitive portrait of a woman who was both a prickly, obsessive eccentric and a tireless media watchdog, one eye always opened for mediated falsehoods.

"Recorder" with Matt Wolf and Scott Macauley

Saturday November 16 1:15PM

Director Matt Wolf joins us for a Q&A, moderated by Scott Macauley, following the 1:15pm screening

For thirty years, Marion Stokes, the African American left-wing activist and archivist, secretly recorded television 24 hours a day. Her project began with the Iran Hostage Crisis and ended upon her death some 70,000 tapes later. Capturing revolutions, wars, triumphs, catastrophes, bloopers, talk shows and commercials that show us how television shaped the world of today, the Philadelphia-based Stokes’s stated intention was to protect the truth while the television networks were carelessly throwing away their own archives. Packed with unexpected twists and unbelievable footage, director Matt Wolf’s film is a sensitive portrait of a woman who was both a prickly, obsessive eccentric and a tireless media watchdog, one eye always opened for mediated falsehoods.

"Recorder" with Matt Wolf and Charlotte Cook

Saturday November 16 6:15PM

Director Matt Wolf joins us for a Q&A, moderated by Charlotte Cook, following the 6:15pm screening

For thirty years, Marion Stokes, the African American left-wing activist and archivist, secretly recorded television 24 hours a day. Her project began with the Iran Hostage Crisis and ended upon her death some 70,000 tapes later. Capturing revolutions, wars, triumphs, catastrophes, bloopers, talk shows and commercials that show us how television shaped the world of today, the Philadelphia-based Stokes’s stated intention was to protect the truth while the television networks were carelessly throwing away their own archives. Packed with unexpected twists and unbelievable footage, director Matt Wolf’s film is a sensitive portrait of a woman who was both a prickly, obsessive eccentric and a tireless media watchdog, one eye always opened for mediated falsehoods.

"Recorder" with Matt Wolf and Melissa Lyde

Sunday November 17 1:15PM

Director Matt Wolf joins us for a Q&A, moderated by Melissa Lyde, following the 1:15pm screening

For thirty years, Marion Stokes, the African American left-wing activist and archivist, secretly recorded television 24 hours a day. Her project began with the Iran Hostage Crisis and ended upon her death some 70,000 tapes later. Capturing revolutions, wars, triumphs, catastrophes, bloopers, talk shows and commercials that show us how television shaped the world of today, the Philadelphia-based Stokes’s stated intention was to protect the truth while the television networks were carelessly throwing away their own archives. Packed with unexpected twists and unbelievable footage, director Matt Wolf’s film is a sensitive portrait of a woman who was both a prickly, obsessive eccentric and a tireless media watchdog, one eye always opened for mediated falsehoods.

"LOOKING FOR LANGSTON" with Isaac Julien

Sunday November 17 3:30PM

Isaac Julien in person

Celebrating its 30th Anniversary, British artist Isaac Julien’s lyrical Looking for Langston fuses archival newsreel footage of 1920s Harlem with original scripted scenes shot in lush black-and-white, in order not only to recreate the atmosphere of the Harlem Renaissance as it exists in the popular imagination, but to specifically highlight the essential role of Black queer identity in that artistic and social movement. The film draws from the works of Langston Hughes (played by Ben Ellison) and James Baldwin, among others, and provocatively imagines the speakeasies of the period as havens for the free expression of Black gay culture and desire.

Screening co-presented with Performa.

"Recorder" with Matt Wolf and Sierra Pettengill

Sunday November 17 3:30PM

Director Matt Wolf joins us for a Q&A, moderated by Sierra Pettengill, following the 3:30pm screening

For thirty years, Marion Stokes, the African American left-wing activist and archivist, secretly recorded television 24 hours a day. Her project began with the Iran Hostage Crisis and ended upon her death some 70,000 tapes later. Capturing revolutions, wars, triumphs, catastrophes, bloopers, talk shows and commercials that show us how television shaped the world of today, the Philadelphia-based Stokes’s stated intention was to protect the truth while the television networks were carelessly throwing away their own archives. Packed with unexpected twists and unbelievable footage, director Matt Wolf’s film is a sensitive portrait of a woman who was both a prickly, obsessive eccentric and a tireless media watchdog, one eye always opened for mediated falsehoods.

"Recorder" with Matt Wolf and Collier Meyerson

Sunday November 17 6:00PM

Director Matt Wolf joins us for a Q&A, moderated by Collier Meyerson, following the 6:00pm screening

For thirty years, Marion Stokes, the African American left-wing activist and archivist, secretly recorded television 24 hours a day. Her project began with the Iran Hostage Crisis and ended upon her death some 70,000 tapes later. Capturing revolutions, wars, triumphs, catastrophes, bloopers, talk shows and commercials that show us how television shaped the world of today, the Philadelphia-based Stokes’s stated intention was to protect the truth while the television networks were carelessly throwing away their own archives. Packed with unexpected twists and unbelievable footage, director Matt Wolf’s film is a sensitive portrait of a woman who was both a prickly, obsessive eccentric and a tireless media watchdog, one eye always opened for mediated falsehoods.

"Recorder" with Matt Wolf and Scott Comer

Wednesday November 20 7:00PM

Director Matt Wolf joins us for a Q&A, moderated by Scott Comer, following the 7pm screening

For thirty years, Marion Stokes, the African American left-wing activist and archivist, secretly recorded television 24 hours a day. Her project began with the Iran Hostage Crisis and ended upon her death some 70,000 tapes later. Capturing revolutions, wars, triumphs, catastrophes, bloopers, talk shows and commercials that show us how television shaped the world of today, the Philadelphia-based Stokes’s stated intention was to protect the truth while the television networks were carelessly throwing away their own archives. Packed with unexpected twists and unbelievable footage, director Matt Wolf’s film is a sensitive portrait of a woman who was both a prickly, obsessive eccentric and a tireless media watchdog, one eye always opened for mediated falsehoods.

"THE GHOST AND MRS. MUIR" with Daniel Schmidt

Friday November 22 8:15PM

One of Mankiewicz’s supreme achievements and a high watermark of Hollywood romanticism, swept along by a yearning, rueful, rich Bernard Herrmann score, starring a perfectly matched Rex Harrison and Gene Tierney in the title roles, and featuring flawless supporting work from Natalie Wood, Edna Best, and George Sanders, as a graceful, mannerly, and ultimately empty lover. A wistful and wise work that has lost none of its ability to charm. With The Glorious Acceptance of Nicolas Chauvin, a rough and raucous deconstruction of national mythologies starring the possibly apocryphal French soldier of the Napoleonic Wars who lent his name to the concept of “Chauvinism.”

"MEDIUM COOL" with John Sayles

Saturday November 23 2:30PM

John Sayles in person

The late, lamented Robert Forster has one of his greatest roles as a television news camera operator who, shooting in Chicago during the summer of the Democratic National Convention, experiences a political epiphany. Shot around the real-life DNC riots and featuring footage that riskily integrates the actors into the actual chaos, Wexler’s film provocatively intermingles documentary and fiction elements, in so doing encapsulating something of the street-level turmoil of the day.

"Greenberg" with Noah Baumbach

Saturday November 23 6:00PM

Noah Baumbach in person

Baumbach in LA. “Are you going to let me in?” Florence (played by Greta Gerwig in the first of her collaborations with Baumbach) asks aloud as she unsuccessfully tries to merge into the next lane. She’ll soon meet Ben Stiller’s Roger Greenberg, who is house-sitting for his much more successful brother in the Hollywood Hills, nursing grudges, and telling anyone who doesn’t ask, “I’m really trying to do nothing for a while.” Stiller and Gerwig’s measured and natural chemistry is expertly directed by Baumbach in a character study about loneliness and our reluctance to let people in. It’s risky, tender and nuanced, just as one would have dreamed for in Baumbach, Stiller, and Gerwig’s first collaboration.

"The Long Goodbye" with Noah Baumbach

Saturday November 23 8:45PM

Noah Baumbach in person

Elliott Gould—who’d appeared for Baumbach as a father figure in Kicking and Screaming—plays a distinctly low-key and somewhat bumbling version of Raymond Chandler’s gumshoe Philip Marlowe in Altman’s singular private dick movie, which updates the source material to a smog-and-pot-hazy 1970s Los Angeles. A mystery involving a missing friend, a sadistic gangster, and a Hemingway-esque novelist (Sterling Hayden) draws Marlowe into a tangle of double-crosses, towards a revelation that will make him reconsider his nonchalant motto: “It’s okay by me.”

"CEMETERY OF SPLENDOR" with Daniel Schmidt

Saturday November 23 10:30PM

Apichatpong’s most recent feature weaves together Thailand’s rich fundament of supernatural mythology and its often troubled national history. Comatose soldiers suffering from a mysterious sleeping sickness are confined to a ward and attached to glowing dream machines, continuing to do battle for the glory of feuding kings long dead in their sleep. The mysteries of the clinic—and its possible connection to an ancient site beneath the foundations—gradually ensnare a housewife (Jenjira Pongpas Widner) who volunteers to look after the sleepers and a young clairvoyant (Jarinpattra Rueangram) in this bewitching and seductive cinematic idyll. Screening with Rose's Everything and More, which centers on an interview with David Wolf, a NASA astronaut who made seven spacewalks and spent 128 days aboard the Mir Space Station.

"While We're Young" with Noah Baumbach

Sunday November 24 1:30PM

Noah Baumbach in person

Married documentarians Josh and Cornelia (Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts) are settling into midlife routine when a much-needed shake-up arrives in the form of a creative couple some twenty years their junior, played by Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried. A sneakily surprising film that masquerades as a comedy of remarriage, but morphs into a reflection on storytelling, art versus commerce, truth and fiction.

"Working Girl" with Noah Baumbach

Sunday November 24 4:15PM

Noah Baumbach in person

Nichols gives a 1980s update to the ‘30s workplace comedy, with working-class Staten Island striver Tess (Melanie Griffith) making a regular ferry commute between her provincial life with neighborhood guy fiancé Alec Baldwin and the world of cosmopolitan high finance, where she works under exec Sigourney Weaver. Their professional relationship is threatened when Tess starts to fall for her boss’s old flame: Harrison Ford at the height of his rugged charm.

"THE FAREWELL" with Lulu Wang

Sunday November 24 7:15PM

Q&A with Lulu Wang and Alison Willmore

Writer-director Wang draws from her own life experience in this funny, frank, and heartfelt diaspora drama, a Sundance sensation starring Crazy Rich Asians’s Awkwafina. Chinese-American writer Billi, en route to a family reunion to Gangchun, must unhappily play along with her parents’ plan to conceal a terminal cancer diagnosis from her beloved grandmother. A breakout performance for Awkwafina, who reveals a real capacity for pathos in this culture-clash tragicomedy.

"In Fabric" with Peter Strickland

Friday December 6 8:30PM

Peter Strickland in person.

A lonely woman (Marianne Jean-Baptiste), recently separated from her husband, visits a bewitching London department store in search of a dress that will transform her life. She’s fitted with a perfectly flattering, artery-red gown—which, in time, will come to unleash a malevolent curse and unstoppable evil, threatening everyone who comes into its path. From acclaimed horror director Peter Strickland, the singular auteur behind the sumptuous sadomasochistic romance The Duke of Burgundy and auditory giallo-homage Berberian Sound Studio, comes a truly nightmarish film, at turns frightening, seductive, and darkly humorous. Channeling voyeuristic fantasies of high fashion and bloodshed, In Fabric is Strickland’s most twisted and brilliantly original vision yet.

An A24 release. Strickland's The Cobbler's Lot, from the 2017 The Field Guide to Evil anthology film, will screen with In Fabric.

"Frances Ha" with Noah Baumbach

Sunday December 8 1:00PM

Noah Baumbach in person

A love story of female friendship. Greta Gerwig co-writes and stars in this masterwork. Her radiant and garrulous Frances negotiates career, friendship, and the shadow-line of a quarter-life crisis. Wandering through Paris, Sacramento, and New York City—lovely in black-and-white—Frances’s quest for self-determination takes her through low lulls and exhilarating highs, in a fabulously contemporary film that exists as both a conversation with the best of the French New Wave and life in present day New York.

"Lady Bird" with Noah Baumbach

Sunday December 8 3:00PM

Noah Baumbach in person

Sacramento teenager Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson (Saoirse Ronan) seemingly can’t wait to get away from her mother—in the opening scene of Gerwig’s directorial debut, she jumps from a moving car to escape her—and escape to a new life at school in New York City, but her heart proves more faithful than she thinks in the coda of this finely shaded depiction of the mother-daughter dynamic, with Laurie Metcalf as a mom whose maternal love expresses itself in a desire to clip her daughter’s wings.

"VALLEY OF THE DOLLS" with Dionne Warwick

Sunday December 15 3:30PM

Screening introduced by Dionne Warwick, who will be signing copies of her new album Dionne Warwick & The Voices of Christmas after the film.

Patty Duke, Sharon Tate, and Barbara Parkins deal with pills, ills, malicious men, and careerist skullduggery starring as Hollywood would-bes in the box-office phenomenon of 1967. Adapted from the Jacqueline Susann bestseller that scandalized America by pulling back the curtain on the seamy side of show business and the fallout of the then-just-beginning Sexual Revolution, and featuring musical contributions by Dionne Warwick, whose ravishingly interpreted theme song was a million-seller that cemented Valley's status as a massive multimedia pop culture event.

"MISTRESS AMERICA" with Noah Baumbach

Sunday December 15 7:00PM

Q&A with Noah Baumbach

College freshman Tracy (Lola Kirke) isn’t having the life-changing experience that she’d expected in New York City, so she’s happy to be taken under the wing of her confident, free-spirited stepsister-to-be (Greta Gerwig, in her second collaboration with Baumbach as co-writer), a thirty-year-old enjoying a financially precarious extended adolescence. A bittersweet study in fleeting family and false idols, bursting with tenderness, broken dreams, and a knock-your-socks off second half that explodes into screwball comedy.

"SOMETHING WILD" with Noah Baumbach

Sunday December 15 9:30PM

Intro by Noah Baumbach

The Squid and the Whale star Jeff Daniels is a corporate cog just miserable enough to be swept off his feet by Melanie Griffith’s devil-may-care Lulu, who drags him from New York City to rural Pennsylvania, where he’s to pose as her successful boyfriend at a high school reunion (featuring The Feelies as the house band), and all the time wondering how he got to where he is at this moment, much like the thrown-together crew of Mistress America. “Jonathan Demme’s picaresque joyride across the American landscape is still arguably the best thing he’s ever done… bobbing between Preston Sturges social farce and Blue Velvet antisocial nightmare”—Chicago Reader

"Marriage Story" with Noah Baumbach

Sunday December 22 1:45PM

Noah Baumbach in person

A love story told through a divorce, Baumbach’s watershed film is a showcase for career-best performances from Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson, perfectly written and executed. Laura Dern, Alan Alda, and Ray Liotta provide kindling in a combustion of raw emotion. Set to a sumptuous score by Randy Newman, the film is honest, compassionate, funny, genre defying, and enormously humane. Baumbach’s newest vision will break your heart and heal it all over again—and feels at times like a culmination of his entire filmography.

"E.T." with Noah Baumbach

Sunday December 22 5:00PM

Noah Baumbach in person

A world-conquering pop culture phenomenon on its original release, today it’s easier to see Spielberg’s boy-and-his-alien fable as the movie it always was—modest and familiar in its domestic setting, supremely sensitive to all the fun and the fear of childhood, and very often close to achieving the sublime. Abandoned on earth, a duck-walking alien longing to “Phone home” encounters a human boy who needs companionship, with unforgettable and heart-rending results.