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Films Showing

November 19

The Princess Bride

The Princess Bride

DIRECTOR: ROB REINER
1987 / 98min / DCP
Reiner’s adaptation of William Goldman’s cheeky novel stars an Errol Flynn-esque Cary Elwes as Westley, true-hearted swashbuckling hero set out to save Princess Buttercup from the nefarious Prince Humperdinck.
Wet Woman in the Wind

Wet Woman in the Wind

DIRECTOR: AKIHIKO SHIOTA
2016 / 77min / DCP
Dissipated Tokyo playwright Kosuke (Tasuku Nagaoka) has retreated to the countryside after deciding he’s done with women, but the indefatigable cat-in-heat Shiori (Yuki Mamiya) has other ideas, clinging to Kosuke like his shadow.

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The Princess Bride

The Princess Bride

DIRECTOR: ROB REINER
1987 / 98min / DCP
Reiner’s adaptation of William Goldman’s cheeky novel stars an Errol Flynn-esque Cary Elwes as Westley, true-hearted swashbuckling hero set out to save Princess Buttercup from the nefarious Prince Humperdinck.
Wet Woman in the Wind

Wet Woman in the Wind

DIRECTOR: AKIHIKO SHIOTA
2016 / 77min / DCP
Dissipated Tokyo playwright Kosuke (Tasuku Nagaoka) has retreated to the countryside after deciding he’s done with women, but the indefatigable cat-in-heat Shiori (Yuki Mamiya) has other ideas, clinging to Kosuke like his shadow.
The Shadow of Women (L'Ombre des femmes)

The Shadow of Women (L'Ombre des femmes)

DIRECTOR: PHILIPPE GARREL
2015 / 73min / DCP
Stanislas Merhar and Clotilde Courau are a fortysomething pair working together as filmmakers, each unfaithful to the other.
On the Beach at Night Alone

On the Beach at Night Alone

DIRECTOR: HONG SANG-SOO
2017 / 101min / DCP
Kim Minhee (Right Now, Wrong Then) stars in both halves of this bittersweet, bifurcated story of romantic distress and booze-fueled self-laceration, moving between her character’s retreat in Hamburg and her hometown of coastal Gangneung.
Jealousy (La jalousie)

Jealousy (La jalousie)

DIRECTOR: PHILIPPE GARREL
2013 / 77min / DCP
In the first film to be completed after the death of his father, Maurice, Garrel has his son Louis playing a character based on the old man, an actor specializing in the French classics, in the process of leaving one woman for another, only to find himself tormented by jealousy as he settles in with young Claudia.
Night Wind (Le Vent De La Nuit)

Night Wind (Le Vent De La Nuit)

DIRECTOR: PHILIPPE GARREL
1999 / 95min / DCP
Stars Catherine Deneuve as an unhappy housewife, Xavier Beauvois her young lover, and a lovely score courtesy of John Cale. A marvel of sustained rhythm and tone.
Rue Fontaine with Philippe Garrel, Artiste

Rue Fontaine with Philippe Garrel, Artiste

DIRECTOR: PHILIPPE GARREL
1984 / 67min / 35mm
Garrel’s old friend Jean-Pierre Léaud stars in the short Rue Fontaine, from the omnibus film Paris vu par… 20 ans après (Paris Seen By... 20 Years Later). Screening with Philippe Garrel, Artiste, a revealing interview with the filmmaker illustrated by clips from his films.
The Inner Scar

The Inner Scar

DIRECTOR: PHILIPPE GARREL
1972 / 60min / 35mm
Features Pierre Clementi (nude) and the Andy Warhol superstar Nico (dressed in a loose robe), and a few others, including Philippe Garrel. Clementi speaks French; Nico sometimes complains in English and sometimes declaims in German verse, and sometimes sings for musical background on the soundtrack.
A Burning Hot Summer (Un été brûlant)

A Burning Hot Summer (Un été brûlant)

DIRECTOR: PHILIPPE GARREL
2011 / 95min / DCP
Louis Garrel’s painter is married to actress Monica Bellucci; when a film takes her from Paris to Rome, they travel there together and meet with another, younger couple—but when the women start to bond, their conversations cause them to call into question the happiness of their relationships.
The Birth of Love (La naissance d'amour)

The Birth of Love (La naissance d'amour)

DIRECTOR: PHILIPPE GARREL
1993 / 94min / 35mm
Jean-Pierre Léaud and Lou Castel (both of whom made their auspicious acting debuts in the equally auspicious directing debuts of François Truffaut and Marco Bellocchio), here are found trying to shake off the doldrums of middle-age and romantic confusion by getting out of Paris together.
An Angel Passes (Un ange passe)

An Angel Passes (Un ange passe)

DIRECTOR: PHILIPPE GARREL
1975 / 79min / 35mm
Many of the familiar faces in the Garrel universe—father Maurice, Laurent Terzieff, Bulle Ogier, and Nico in a stunning live performance sequence, framed by the dark of the night sky.
Vengeance is Mine

Vengeance is Mine

DIRECTOR: SHOHEI IMAMURA
1979 / 140min / 35mm
Imamura’s return to fiction after nearly a decade in documentary finds him freely mixing newsreel and formalist style to report a thinly-fictionalized version of serial killer Akira Nishiguchi’s 1963 murder spree, told in flashback vignettes noteworthy for their total absence of sensationalism.
Videodrome

Videodrome

DIRECTOR: DAVID CRONENBERG
1983 / 87min / 35mm
As Toronto UHF television programmer and softcore smut aficionado James Woods scents the trail of an intercepted snuff film broadcast, he makes a nasty NSA new friend in the form of Debbie Harry, and stumbles into a mind-control conspiracy which wreaks havoc on his mind and, seemingly, his very physiology.
Vanishing Point

Vanishing Point

DIRECTOR: RICHARD C. SARAFIAN
1971 / 99min / DCP
At the center of Sarafian’s cerebral muscle car movie is Kowalski (Barry Newman), an ex-stock car driver turned deliveryman who’s now dedicated to outrunning his own demons.
Ulzana's Raid

Ulzana's Raid

DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALDRICH
1972 / 103min / 35mm
Almost twenty years after Apache, their first collaboration, and in the midst of the Vietnam Era, Aldrich and Burt Lancaster returned to the setting of the Indian Wars to produce this pitiless classic, one of the toughest, bleakest Westerns ever made.
Anti-Porno

Anti-Porno

DIRECTOR: SION SONO
2016 / 76min / DCP
Young multi-hyphenate artist Kyoko (Ami Tomite) wreaks havoc on everyone that she encounters, the worst being reserved for simpering older assistant Noriko (Mariko Trutsui), whom she routinely humiliates—or at least that’s what seems to be happening, before an abrupt about-face.
Vampyres

Vampyres

DIRECTOR: JOSé RAMóN LARRAZ
1974 / 87min / 35mm
Marianne Morris and Anulka “Miss May 1973” Dziubinska are a pulchritudinous pair of bloodsucking girlfriends who welcome a suspicious young couple to their manorial lair, where deadly games soon get underway.
THAT DARN CAT!

THAT DARN CAT!

DIRECTOR: ROBERT STEVENSON
1965 / 116min / 35mm
When Siamese tomcat DC (“Darn Cat”) shows up one day wearing a wristwatch around his neck, sisters Hayley Mills and Dorothy Provine are drawn into a mystery involving a kidnapped bank teller and the dastardly duo of Frank Gorshin and Neville Brand.
The Untouchables

The Untouchables

DIRECTOR: BRIAN DE PALMA
1987 / 119min / 35mm
De Palma collaborates with De Niro for the first time in seventeen years, casting him as a terrifying, baseball-bat wielding Al Capone in this masterful adaptation of the late fifties-early sixties TV series.
The Vertical Ray of the Sun

The Vertical Ray of the Sun

DIRECTOR: TRAN ANH HUNG
2000 / 112min / 35mm
There’s a darkness at the heart of Hung’s film, which begins as three sisters in Hanoi are reunited by the anniversary of their mother’s death, but what is extraordinary about the movie is how awash it is in light—an enchanting light, a benediction which gives daily ritual a quality of the hyperreal.
THE UNBELIEVABLE TRUTH

THE UNBELIEVABLE TRUTH

DIRECTOR: HAL HARTLEY
1989 / 90min / 35mm
Hartley’s first feature announced the arrival of a filmmaker who heard the beat of a very different drum, an all-American blue-collar Bressonian who found a peculiar beauty in the tattier corners of his native Long Island.
Viva La Muerte

Viva La Muerte

DIRECTOR: FERNANDO ARRABAL
1971 / 90min / 35mm
Fernando Arrabal made his cinematic debut with this interpretation of his own novel, setting an adolescent boy’s coming-of-age against the backdrop of the Spanish Civil War.
Regular Lovers

Regular Lovers

DIRECTOR: PHILIPPE GARREL
2005 / 183min / 35mm
Francois is a young poet who goes from the exhilaration of the barricades of May '68 to the exhaustion of drug addiction and aimlessness.
PERFUMED NIGHTMARE

PERFUMED NIGHTMARE

DIRECTOR: KIDLAT TAHIMIK
1977 / 93min / 16mm
A young Filipino besotted with space travel and the West he follows his dreams into Europe and the gumball business.
UNKNOWN CHAPLIN

UNKNOWN CHAPLIN

DIRECTOR: KEVIN BROWNLOW & DAVID GILL
1983 / 156min / 16mm
English film historians Brownlow and Gill, under the auspices of Photoplay Productions, together collaborated on series of documentaries which together act as a peerless primer in silent cinema, elucidating its forgotten charms and its unparalleled beauties.
Women in Love

Women in Love

DIRECTOR: KEN RUSSELL
1969 / 131min / DCP
Russell’s D.H. Lawrence adaptation was a rollicking succès de scandale when it first appeared, infamous for, among other things, a disrobed fireside tussle between best mates Oliver Reed and Alan Bates.
The Crow

The Crow

DIRECTOR: ALEX PROYAS
1994 / 102min / 35mm
Proyas’s Detroit-set story of the titular undead superhero’s one-man war against the criminal underworld is acutely attuned to the grimy glamor of post-industrial rot, with Lee’s commanding star turn backed by a grunge/industrial/shoegaze soundtrack that’s a classic in its own right.
The Craft

The Craft

DIRECTOR: ANDREW FLEMING
1996 / 101min / 35mm
The Craft has Robin Tunney’s new arrival at a Los Angeles high school discovering her telekinetic abilities and subsequently attracting the attention of a nascent coven of witches made up of Neve Campbell, Rachel True, and Fairuza Balk.
Mon Oncle

Mon Oncle

DIRECTOR: JACQUES TATI
1958 / 117min / DCP
A marvel of timing and comic choreography by the direct descendant of Chaplin, Jacques Tati, who exceeds the master in his hysterical use of sound effects.
The Tomb of Ligeia

The Tomb of Ligeia

DIRECTOR: ROGER CORMAN
1964 / 82min / 35mm
Price is back front-and-center for the finale of Corman’s Edgar Allan Poe cycle, here playing another isolated 19th century nobleman brooding amidst lavish period décor—this time he’s condemned by vision problems to wear tinted glasses, and haunted by the spirit of his deceased first wife.
Nosferatu

Nosferatu

DIRECTOR: F. W. MURNAU
1922 / 81min / DCP
The O.G. bloodsucker, in many ways Murnau’s unlicensed adaptation of Bram Stroker’s Dracula is still unrivalled in the sense of disgust and creeping dread it sustains.
Lost Highway

Lost Highway

DIRECTOR: DAVID LYNCH
1997 / 134min / 35mm
The film is a noir-inflected, shape-shifting southern California deathtrip, features several slabs of Rammstein, a Marilyn Manson cameo, and a soundtrack compiled by Trent Reznor.
Häxan: Witchcraft through the Ages

Häxan: Witchcraft through the Ages

DIRECTOR: BENJAMIN CHRISTENSEN
1922/1968 / 78min / DCP
Mad Dane Christensen stirred up this heady brew of a film, an “expose” on the hidden history of the occult that combines re-enactments, animations, and a bevy of Boschian imagery to make what might be the proto-cult movie.
Bride of Frankenstein

Bride of Frankenstein

DIRECTOR: JAMES WHALE
1935 / 75min / 35mm
Whale’s sequel to his horror hit brings back Colin Clive’s mad scientist and Boris Karloff’s melancholy monster, then adds on Elsa Lanchester as the bouffanted bride.
Rebecca

Rebecca

DIRECTOR: ALFRED HITCHCOCK
1940 / 130min / 35mm
Hitchcock's gothic thriller starring Joan Fontaine as a nameless youngnwoman who becomes enamored with Laurence Olivier’s saturnine, aristocratic widower.
Interview with the Vampire

Interview with the Vampire

DIRECTOR: NEIL JORDAN
1994 / 123min / 35mm
Director Neil Jordan who gives the necessary pomp and swirl to the story of the centuries-long tutelage between vampire Lestat (Tom Cruise) and his newly-turned charge, Louis (Brad Pitt), from 18th century Louisiana to the present day.
The Lost Boys

The Lost Boys

DIRECTOR: JOEL SCHUMACHER
1987 / 97min / 35mm
The Lost Boys transfers Transylvanian vampire lore to sunny beachfront Santa Carla, California, where brothers Corey Haim and Jason Patric run afoul of a vampire gang run by Kiefer Sutherland.
The Doom Generation

The Doom Generation

DIRECTOR: GREGG ARAKI
1995 / 83min / 35mm
Araki follows a trio of gorgeous, disaffected youths with primary color-coded names across an all-American hellscape rendered in assaultive artificial colors, their flight a channel-surf through bizarre celebrity cameos
Rosemary's Baby

Rosemary's Baby

DIRECTOR: ROMAN POLANSKI
1968 / 137min / 35mm
Young couple Mia Farrow and John Cassavetes make friendly with elder neighbor couple Ruth Gordon and Sidney Blackmer, but Farrow’s harried Rosemary starts to wonder why everyone is so eager for her to get a daily dosage of tannis root.
Vampire Hunter D

Vampire Hunter D

DIRECTOR: TOYOO ASHIDA
1985 / 80min / DCP
In the year 12,090 AD, the decimated remains of humanity live on as chattel for the ruling vampire class. Some, though, have chosen to fight back—like Doris Lang, who, rather than become the bride of Count Magnus Lee, employs the services of the eponymous D. Chic and ultraviolent.
Singin' in the Rain

Singin' in the Rain

DIRECTOR: STANLEY DONEN AND GENE KELLY
1952 / 103min / DCP
The greatest movie musical of all time, Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly’s meta marvel takes place near the tail end of the silent film era, when Hollywood’s biggest stars were anxiety-ridden about the looming threat of talking pictures.
The Innocents

The Innocents

DIRECTOR: JACK CLAYTON
1961 / 100min / DCP
Clayton’s adaptation of Henry James’s celebrated psychological horror tale “The Turn of the Screw,” starring Deborah Kerr as a governess who finds herself harassed by supernatural visions while minding two young children in a remote manse.
Spider Baby

Spider Baby

DIRECTOR: JACK HILL
1967 / 81min / 35mm
Chauffeur Lon Chaney, Jr. attempts to cover up the cannibalistic indiscretions of his charges, the Merrye family, as distant relations try to sell their house out from under them.
Breaking the Frame

Breaking the Frame

DIRECTOR: MARIELLE NITOSLAWSKA
2012 / 100min / DCP
By turns elliptical, poetic, and visceral, the wildly inventive Breaking the Frame eschews tepid paint-by-numbers biography, offering instead that rare artist doc that finds an innovative form worthy of its groundbreaking subject.
Cemetery Man

Cemetery Man

DIRECTOR: MICHELE SOAVI
1994 / 105min / 35mm
Soave’s adaptation of the popular comic series Dylan Dog stars lantern-jawed Rupert Everett as the minder of the Buffalora cemetery, where the newly dead require diligent re-killing.
House of Usher with The Fall of the House of Usher

House of Usher with The Fall of the House of Usher

DIRECTOR: ROGER CORMAN
1960 / 142min / 35mm
The first of Corman’s eight-film cycle of deliriously stylish, extravagantly colorful Edgar Allan Poe adaptations has the director’s go-to star Vincent Price as Roderick Usher, accursed owner of a mansion hemmed in by a blasted black swamp and his conviction of being under a hereditary curse.
Possession

Possession

DIRECTOR: ANDRZEJ ŻUłAWSKI
1981 / 124min / 35mm
Żuławski’s one-of-a-kind genre pastiche has spy Sam Neill returning to his Berlin home from a mission abroad to discover that wife Isabelle Adjani wants suddenly to split up.
Bram Stoker's Dracula

Bram Stoker's Dracula

DIRECTOR: FRANCIS FORD COPPOLA
1992 / 128min / 35mm
Coppola at his most boldly baroque, Gary Oldman wearing cinema’s most iconic updo, a puppyish young Keanu Reeves trying to make his way back to Winona Ryder, and Anthony Hopkins as vampire hunter Abraham Van Helsing.
The Haunting

The Haunting

DIRECTOR: ROBERT WISE
1963 / 112min / 35mm
The “Old Dark House” setting, a staple of Gothic fiction, was given a new lease on life in this harrowing cinematic dark ride by former Val Lewton director Wise, an ingenious work of devilish, leering camera trickery.
The Devil Rides Out

The Devil Rides Out

DIRECTOR: TERENCE FISHER
1968 / 95min / DCP
Investigating a satanic plot leads Lee’s Duc de Richleau, on the side of good for once, into a black magick circle led by Charles Gray, and face-to-face with occult horrors.
Fascination

Fascination

DIRECTOR: JEAN ROLLIN
1979 / 80min / DCP
a hypnotic, dream logic-driven period piece set in motion when a thief takes refuge in a château presided over by beautiful Brigitte Lahaie and Franca Maï, a film that begins with abattoir home remedies and leads to swinging aristocrats and swinging scythes.
Nosferatu the Vampyre

Nosferatu the Vampyre

DIRECTOR: WERNER HERZOG
1979 / 107min / 35mm
Herzog brashly took up the mantle of German Expressionism in revisiting the unhallowed soil of Murnau’s masterpiece, with old foe and collaborator Klaus Kinski as the pestilent Count and Isabelle Adjani as the owner of the pale, slender neck that he so dearly desires to drink of.
Gothic

Gothic

DIRECTOR: KEN RUSSELL
1986 / 87min / 35mm
Russell goes back to the ground zero of gothic horror, to the dark and stormy night at Lord Byron’s Lake Geneva villa in 1816 that led to Mary Shelley writing Frankenstein and Dr. John William Polidori writing The Vampyre.
Girlfriends

Girlfriends

DIRECTOR: CLAUDIA WEILL
1978 / 86min / 35mm
A photographer and her girlfriend are roommates; when her roommate decides to get married and leave, she feels hurt and has to learn how to deal with living alone.
Freud

Freud

DIRECTOR: JOHN HUSTON
1962 / 140min / 35mm
John Huston's pseudobiographical movie depicts five years from 1885 on in the life of the Viennese psychologist Sigmund Freud.
Twilight

Twilight

DIRECTOR: CATHERINE HARDWICKE
2008 / 122min / DCP
Thanks to director Hardwicke’s deep understanding of and love for teenage self-dramatizing, the lushly melancholy atmosphere of the Washington State setting, and the enormous charisma of the young leads, Twilight came out a modern pop classic.
Near Dark

Near Dark

DIRECTOR: KATHRYN BIGELOW
1987 / 94min / 35mm
Southern farm boy Adrian Pasdar takes a fancy to pallid stranger Jenny Wright, but later has occasion to regret it when he meets her “family”—a gang of hungry, pistol-packing vampires terrorizing the southwestern countryside in a roving RV.
MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS

MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS

DIRECTOR: VINCENTE MINNELLI
1944 / 113min / 35mm
A trailblazing “naturalist” musical set at the turn follows the four Smith sisters as they navigate growing up on the eve of the World's Fair and a looming move to New York.
Dracula

Dracula

DIRECTOR: TOD BROWNING
1931 / 85min / 35mm
All of modern vampiredom issued out from under the cloak of Bela Lugosi’s suave, seductive Transylvanian Count, his every carefully-enunciated line reading the stuff of legend.
Auntie Mame

Auntie Mame

DIRECTOR: MORTON DACOSTA
1958 / 143min / 35mm
“Life is a banquet, and most poor suckers are starving to death!” So says Rosalind Russell’s extravagant Auntie Mame, mentoring an orphaned nephew in the art of living in her Park Avenue palace, where the Jazz Age is in full swing.
The Hunger

The Hunger

DIRECTOR: TONY SCOTT
1983 / 97min / 35mm
Catherine Deneuve and David Bowie as a couple of posh, centuries-old nightclubbing New York bloodsuckers who, when one begins to show the first signs of aging, recruit assistance from Susan Sarandon’s geriatrics researcher, then find themselves in a very, very attractive throuple.
Barbara Hammer: Mischief and Play

Barbara Hammer: Mischief and Play

DIRECTOR: BARBARA HAMMER
Various / 86min / 35mm
Since the late 1960s, pioneering experimental filmmaker and artist Barbara Hammer has been making films that explore lesbian subjectivity and sexuality, politics and representation, and visceral manifestations of pleasure and discomfort, using the camera as an extension of her body to see, touch, explore, and often laugh.
Blood for Dracula

Blood for Dracula

DIRECTOR: PAUL MORRISSEY
1974 / 106min / 35mm
Cult actor Udo Kier straps on the fangs for Warhol Factory house director Paul Morrissey, playing a sickly, dying Dracula in search of virgin blood in the 1920s Italian countryside.
A Hard Day's Night

A Hard Day's Night

DIRECTOR: RICHARD LESTER
1964 / 87min / DCP
If you want to explain everything that was sweet and strange and rocking and rollicking about the Beatles in ninety minutes or less, this is the one-stop primer, a pinball pop comedy that captures the lads at their most pleasing and eager to please.
Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights

DIRECTOR: WILLIAM WYLER
1939 / 104min / 35mm
Emily Brontë’s 1847 tale of the doomed romance between surly Yorkshire gypsy-cum-gentryman Heathcliff and Catherine, the love of his childhood years, has been filmed many times, though never so beautifully as in this richly atmospheric Wyler production.
Beetlejuice

Beetlejuice

DIRECTOR: TIM BURTON
1988 / 92min / 35mm
Winona Ryder is a brooding teen in widow’s weeds relocated by her parents to a creaky country house that happens to be haunted by the unquiet spirits of owners Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis, egged on in mischief-making by Michael Keaton’s Ghost with the Most.