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Films Showing

June 24

The Invisible Man

The Invisible Man

11:00am
DIRECTOR: JAMES WHALE
1933 / 71min / 35mm
A scientist discovers the formula for a serum that makes him invisible, and quickly becomes drunk on the power of scot-free anonymity.
Ganja & Hess

Ganja & Hess

11:45am
DIRECTOR: BILL GUNN
1973 / 110min / DCP
Duane Jones is an anthropologist living in aristocratic splendor in the Hudson Valley who finds himself lusting for blood after being stabbed by his unstable assistant (Bill Gunn).
Werckmeister Harmonies

Werckmeister Harmonies

1:00pm
DIRECTOR: BéLA TARR
2000 / 145min / 35mm
A traveling circus touting the display of an honest-to-God whale rolls into a blighted backwater of a Hungarian village already preparing for apocalypse.
The Master

The Master

4:00pm
DIRECTOR: PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON
2012 / 138min / 35mm
Anderson’s aching, ambitious, deeply ambiguous psychodrama pairs alcoholic ex-serviceman Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and messianic film-flam man Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) in a cage match bromance that doubles as a meditation on the groundswell of new faiths.
Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade

Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade

2:00pm4:30pm
DIRECTOR: STEVEN SPIELBERG
1989 / 127min / DCP
Two-fisted archaeologistHarrison Ford and his tweedy, disproving father (Sean Connery, brilliantly against-type) take on Nazis in a race for the Holy Grail.
Woman in the Dunes

Woman in the Dunes

7:00pm
DIRECTOR: HIROSHI TESHIGAHARA
1964 / 147min / 35mm
this landmark of the Japanese New Wave stars Eiji Okada as an entomologist who, while searching for rare insects in a secluded village, comes into contact with Kyoko Kishida, a lonely woman who seems to want to keep him for a specimen of her own.
Les Carabiniers

Les Carabiniers

7:00pm8:30pm
DIRECTOR: JEAN-LUC GODARD
1963 / 80min / 35mm
In an invented country that’s everywhere and nowhere, in a time out of time, two poor schlemiels receive a missive from their king that promises untold riches in exchange for their service in battle, in which they are encouraged to pillage, rape, and plunder at will.
Walker

Walker

10:00pm
DIRECTOR: ALEX COX
1987 / 94min / 35mm
Shot on location in Nicaragua, Ed Harris plays William Walker, a Manifest Destiny zealot who follows a failed putsch in Mexico with a successful 1855 overthrow of the Nicaraguan government.
A Fistful Of Dollars

A Fistful Of Dollars

10:15pm
DIRECTOR: SERGIO LEONE
1964 / 96min / DCP
With this blackly comic, cynical, dust-choked movie, Leone revolutionized the quintessentially American western genre from his native Italy. Leone’s pitiless, operatic work has Clint Eastwood arriving in the crime-ridden ‘burg of San Migue. A work of bleak, brutal beauty, and a stern reminder to never talk shit about Clint Eastwood’s mule.

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The Invisible Man

The Invisible Man

DIRECTOR: JAMES WHALE
1933 / 71min / 35mm
A scientist discovers the formula for a serum that makes him invisible, and quickly becomes drunk on the power of scot-free anonymity.
Ganja & Hess

Ganja & Hess

DIRECTOR: BILL GUNN
1973 / 110min / DCP
Duane Jones is an anthropologist living in aristocratic splendor in the Hudson Valley who finds himself lusting for blood after being stabbed by his unstable assistant (Bill Gunn).
Werckmeister Harmonies

Werckmeister Harmonies

DIRECTOR: BéLA TARR
2000 / 145min / 35mm
A traveling circus touting the display of an honest-to-God whale rolls into a blighted backwater of a Hungarian village already preparing for apocalypse.
Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade

Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade

2:00pm4:30pm
DIRECTOR: STEVEN SPIELBERG
1989 / 127min / DCP
Two-fisted archaeologistHarrison Ford and his tweedy, disproving father (Sean Connery, brilliantly against-type) take on Nazis in a race for the Holy Grail.
The Master

The Master

DIRECTOR: PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON
2012 / 138min / 35mm
Anderson’s aching, ambitious, deeply ambiguous psychodrama pairs alcoholic ex-serviceman Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and messianic film-flam man Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) in a cage match bromance that doubles as a meditation on the groundswell of new faiths.
Woman in the Dunes

Woman in the Dunes

DIRECTOR: HIROSHI TESHIGAHARA
1964 / 147min / 35mm
this landmark of the Japanese New Wave stars Eiji Okada as an entomologist who, while searching for rare insects in a secluded village, comes into contact with Kyoko Kishida, a lonely woman who seems to want to keep him for a specimen of her own.
Les Carabiniers

Les Carabiniers

7:00pm8:30pm
DIRECTOR: JEAN-LUC GODARD
1963 / 80min / 35mm
In an invented country that’s everywhere and nowhere, in a time out of time, two poor schlemiels receive a missive from their king that promises untold riches in exchange for their service in battle, in which they are encouraged to pillage, rape, and plunder at will.
Walker

Walker

DIRECTOR: ALEX COX
1987 / 94min / 35mm
Shot on location in Nicaragua, Ed Harris plays William Walker, a Manifest Destiny zealot who follows a failed putsch in Mexico with a successful 1855 overthrow of the Nicaraguan government.
A Fistful Of Dollars

A Fistful Of Dollars

DIRECTOR: SERGIO LEONE
1964 / 96min / DCP
With this blackly comic, cynical, dust-choked movie, Leone revolutionized the quintessentially American western genre from his native Italy. Leone’s pitiless, operatic work has Clint Eastwood arriving in the crime-ridden ‘burg of San Migue. A work of bleak, brutal beauty, and a stern reminder to never talk shit about Clint Eastwood’s mule.
Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot

Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot

DIRECTOR: GUS VAN SANT
2018 / 113min / DCP
Joaquin Phoenix, cementing his status as his generation’s greatest actor and shapeshifter, plays the hell-raising, provocatively un-P.C. Callahan, a wheelchair-bound speed demon clawing his way out of the hell of alcoholism with the help of life coach and sponsor Donny—an unrecognizable and exceptional Jonah Hill.
To Die For

To Die For

DIRECTOR: GUS VAN SANT
1995 / 106min / 35mm
Through the character of Nicole Kidman’s manipulative, celebrity-fixated meteorologist, Van Sant creates a queasily perspicacious study of the American obsession with fame in this mockumentary loosely based on the true crime case of Pamela Smart.
Rock Rubber 45s

Rock Rubber 45s

DIRECTOR: BOBBITO GARCIA
2018 / 96min / DCP
DJ, author, filmmaker, TV/radio personality, B-ball player, card-carrying Rock Steady Crew member, and all-around apostle for NYC street culture, Bobbito García aka Kool Bob Love draws in this film on the whole of his life experience.
Drugstore Cowboy

Drugstore Cowboy

1989 / 102min / 35mm
A snapshot of life on the edge, featuring Matt Dillon, Kelly Lynch, and the always great Max Perlich as a small posse of addicts traveling across the c. 1971 Pacific Northwest, feeding their habits by conning and cadging from every pharmacy they encounter along the way.
My Own Private Idaho

My Own Private Idaho

1991 / 104min / 35mm
A Pacific Northwestern retelling of Shakespeare’s Falstaff-Hal bromance, with a narcoleptic queer hustler, Mike, and the slumming scion of a wealthy family, Scott, who looks after Mike, and takes him on a quest for his mother.
Good Will Hunting

Good Will Hunting

DIRECTOR: GUS VAN SANT
1997 / 126min / 35mm
Co-screenwriter Matt Damon is a blue-collar autodidact math prodigy squandering his talent as a janitor at MIT and passing his free time in his native South Boston boozing and brawling, until he meets his mental match in the person of Robin Williams’ full-contact psychologist.
The Phantom Tollbooth

The Phantom Tollbooth

DIRECTOR: CHUCK JONES, ABE LEVITOW, AND DAVID MONAHAN
1970 / 90min / 35mm
Legendary animator Chuck Jones adapts Norman Juster’s beloved children’s book about Milo who strolls the San Francisco streets and pops into the titular tollbooth, emerging in a mind-bending animated alternate universe that operates by its own surreal set of rules.
Psycho

Psycho

1998 / 105min / 35mm
This “shot-by-shot” remake of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 masterwork is pdated to a late 90s setting, with subtle deviations from the original permitted by new camera technology and relaxed censorship, and with the nonpareil Christopher Doyle shooting in vividly saturated color in place of the old black-and-white cinematography.
Paranoid Park

Paranoid Park

DIRECTOR: GUS VAN SANT
2007 / 85min / 35mm
Teenaged skate rat Alex—Gabe Nevins, leading a largely amateur cast recruited via MySpace—finds himself a prime suspect in the death of a security guard, silently carrying a crushing burden of knowledge through his daily rounds.
Gerry

Gerry

DIRECTOR: GUS VAN SANT
2002 / 103min / 35mm
Two men, both named Gerry, drive off into the desert, pull over, then wander into the wastes with no firm destination and, finally, no direction home.
Last Days

Last Days

DIRECTOR: GUS VAN SANT
2005 / 97min / 35mm
Michael Pitt plays “Blake”—a facsimile of Kurt Cobain in everything but name—escaped from rehab to wander the grounds of his compound/ flophouse in an opioid haze, taking calls, recording music, desultorily interacting with his roommates, and meandering towards eternity.
The Hit

The Hit

DIRECTOR: STEPHEN FREARS
1984 / 98min / 35mm
The cream of English screen acting is on display in Frears’ auspicious, underseen feature debut, in which turncoat gangster Terence Stamp is ferreted out of hiding in his Spanish villa by two hitmen-old pro John Hurt and youthful hothead Tim Roth
The Citizen

The Citizen

DIRECTOR: ROLAND VRANIK
2017 / 110min / DCP
Wilson, a political refugee from Guinea Bissau now working as a security guard in Budapest, stumbles into love with Mary, the married teacher helping him cram for Hungarian citizenship, a situation further complicated by his paternal feelings for a fellow immigrant.
The Dark Crystal

The Dark Crystal

DIRECTOR: JIM HENSON & FRANK OZ
1982 / 93min / DCP
Henson and Oz, in a distinct departure from Muppetry-as-usual, undertook this fabulous fantasy that put the full resources of the Creature Shop to work, using a combination of puppetry, analog animatronics, and cutting-edge special effects to create a completely realized universe. On a faraway planet a stalwart Gelfling, Jen, sets off on a quest to find a piece of a magic gem with the power to bring balance back to the world, along the way battling wicked Skeksis.
Milford Graves Full Mantis

Milford Graves Full Mantis

DIRECTOR: JAKE MEGINSKY AND CO-DIRECTOR NEIL YOUNG
2018 / 91min / DCP
In making a documentary portrait of a genius like percussionist Milford Graves, a giant of experimental free-jazz, filmmaker Jake Meginsky couldn’t very well go the usual stodgy talking heads route. Instead he matches interviews with Graves, a charismatic polymath and tireless worker residing in Queens and still bubbling over at seventy-six with disparate enthusiasms including Chinese medicine, martial arts, and biorhythm-based beats, to an appropriately idiosyncratic editing cadence which includes some truly astonishing archival footage. A rare music doc that lays down its own unpredictable beat.
BFG

BFG

DIRECTOR: STEVEN SPIELBERG
2016 / 117min / DCP
That’s short for Big Friendly Giant, a twenty-four-foot tall titan played (with a little help from a crack special effects team) by Mark Rylance in Spielberg’s enormously charming adaptation of the beloved Roald Dahl book. Ten-year-old Sophie (Ruby Barnhill) is naturally frightened by her first meeting with the lumbering BFG, but discovers in time that he’s a model playmate—though the same can’t be said of Fleshlumpeater, Bloodbottler, and the other giants who they’re endeavoring to stop with the help of Queen Victoria.
Grease

Grease

DIRECTOR: RANDAL KLEISER
1978 / 110min / 35mm
Hot off of Saturday Night Fever and super-celebrity, triple threat John Travolta paired with rising Australian pop star Olivia Newton-John in this fizzy, festive, high-energy screen adaptation of the wildly popular 1971 stage musical, a titanic hit and, retrospectively, a sort of last hurrah for the Hollywood musical.
Doctor Dolittle

Doctor Dolittle

DIRECTOR: BETTY THOMAS
1998 / 85min / 35mm
After a close call auto accident, Eddie Murphy’s San Francisco surgeon John Dolittle rediscovers a boyhood ability to conversate with animals, but his “gift” soon proves more of a curse, as he becomes the hapless confidante of a menagerie of beasts with voices provided by Albert Brooks, Chris Rock, Brian Doyle-Murray, Norm MacDonald, and more.
Yellowstone Cubs

Yellowstone Cubs

DIRECTOR: CHARLES L. DRAPER
1963 / 48min / 35mm
Romping along with Tuffy and Tubby, two bear cubs separated from their mother, on an epic journey through Yellowstone National Park, the rambunctious and often hilarious Yellowstone Cubs exemplifies the qualities particular to the Disney nature documentary—sound storytelling, the magical merger of score and image, and a superabundance of humor and winsome delight.
The General

The General

DIRECTOR: BUSTER KEATON
1926 / 67min / DCP
Keaton’s engineer Johnnie Gray is another of his big-hearted little guys, rejected by the Confederate Army—though when the Union tries to make off with his train, runt Johnnie shows his mettle in the most incredible sustained chase sequence in all of silent comedy.
Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory

Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory

DIRECTOR: MEL STUART
1971 / 100min / 35mm
A world of pure imagination—and psychedelic misadventures—awaits! Gene Wilder is the definitive Wonka, a suave, arch, and possibly insane master of ceremonies in a purple velvet frock coat, offering a guided tour of his scrumdidilyumptious confectionary factory.
The Tale of Princess Kaguya

The Tale of Princess Kaguya

DIRECTOR: ISAO TAKAHATA
2013 / 137min / DCP
A richly realized fable that begins when a bamboo cutter discovers a tiny girl inside of one of the shoots that he’s chopping, and decides to raise her as a princess—a decision that has very little to do with her down-to-earth nature. The final film by Studio Ghibli’s recently-passed co-founder, Takahata, and among his greatest achievements, with every frame a marvel of storytelling concision and handcrafted care.
On the Town

On the Town

DIRECTOR: STANLEY DONEN AND GENE KELLY
1949 / 98min / 35mm
Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, and Jules Munshin are three sailors with twenty-four hours of shore leave in Manhattan; Vera-Ellen, Betty Garrett, and Ann Miller are the footloose gals helping them make the most of it; and a show-stopping songbook, including Leonard Bernstein’s “New York, New York,” does the rest of the work in this almost criminally enjoyable romp.