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Films Showing

June 16

Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation

Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation

11:00am
DIRECTOR: HENRY KOSTER
1962 / 116min / 35mm
Jimmy Stewart, reteaming with his Harvey director Koster, gives us the American family man’s version of Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday, with Stewart’s stressed-out banker Hobbs trying to survive his vacation in one piece, dealing alongside wife Maureen O’Hara with a run-down beach house crammed to bursting with in-laws, grandkids, and other perils.
Safe at Home!

Safe at Home!

1:30pm
DIRECTOR: WALTER DONIGER
1962 / 84min / 16mm
Meaty big-screen roles for New York Yankees superstars Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris anchor this amiable sports comedy, released the year after Maris’s landmark 61-dinger season. A Florida boy’s fib to his Little League teammates—that he knows Mantel and Maris—gets out of hand, and leads to him shadowing his idols through spring training, with hilarious results.
Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings

Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings

DIRECTOR: JOHN BADHAM
1976 / 110min / 35mm
This bumptious baseball comedy courtesy of Motown Productions, set in the last years of the Negro League era, features the royalty of Black American screen acting in its starting lineup, including Billy Dee Williams as the Satchel Paige-like pitcher who cooks up a plan to break with penny-pinching management, James Earl Jones as his cerebral slugger foil who goes along with the roadshow, and Richard Pryor as a player plotting to break into the white leagues by masquerading as a Cuban.
The Raft

The Raft

11:00am3:30pm5:45pm
DIRECTOR: MARCUS LINDEEN
2018 / 97min / DCP
In the summer of 1973, an international crew of six women and five men, chosen for their youth, diversity, and sex appeal, embarked together on a most unusual sea voyage—a close-quarters, privacy-free trip across the Atlantic on a raft christened the Acali.
Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai

Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai

DIRECTOR: JIM JARMUSCH
1999 / 116min / 35mm
Forest Whitaker’s Ghost Dog isn’t your average Mafia hitman. He’s a devoted bibliophile, follows the samurai code as laid out in Yamamoto Tsunetomo’s Hagakure, and relaxes by tending to his pigeon coop, which you’d be wise not to mess with.
Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes

Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes

DIRECTOR: SOPHIE HUBER
2018 / 85min / DCP
Director Sophie Huber (Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction) uses choice archival footage and new recording sessions and interviews with contemporary-and-former label luminaries including Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Robert Glasper and Norah Jones to tell the story of this label that revolutionized jazz, and its persistent pursuit of musical freedom and belief in the revolutionary possibilities of music. Photograph
Only Lovers Left Alive

Only Lovers Left Alive

DIRECTOR: JIM JARMUSCH
2013 / 123min / 35mm
How do you keep a love affair alive for a lifetime? For several lifetimes? These are some the questions posed by Jarmusch’s original and seductive interpretation of the vampire movie, in which undead spouses Tilda Swinton and Tom Hiddleston—sometimes together, sometimes apart—have been keeping company for centuries, here seen traveling from Detroit to Tangier.

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Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation

Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation

DIRECTOR: HENRY KOSTER
1962 / 116min / 35mm
Jimmy Stewart, reteaming with his Harvey director Koster, gives us the American family man’s version of Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday, with Stewart’s stressed-out banker Hobbs trying to survive his vacation in one piece, dealing alongside wife Maureen O’Hara with a run-down beach house crammed to bursting with in-laws, grandkids, and other perils.
The Raft

The Raft

DIRECTOR: MARCUS LINDEEN
2018 / 97min / DCP
In the summer of 1973, an international crew of six women and five men, chosen for their youth, diversity, and sex appeal, embarked together on a most unusual sea voyage—a close-quarters, privacy-free trip across the Atlantic on a raft christened the Acali.
Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes

Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes

DIRECTOR: SOPHIE HUBER
2018 / 85min / DCP
Director Sophie Huber (Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction) uses choice archival footage and new recording sessions and interviews with contemporary-and-former label luminaries including Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Robert Glasper and Norah Jones to tell the story of this label that revolutionized jazz, and its persistent pursuit of musical freedom and belief in the revolutionary possibilities of music. Photograph
Safe at Home!

Safe at Home!

DIRECTOR: WALTER DONIGER
1962 / 84min / 16mm
Meaty big-screen roles for New York Yankees superstars Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris anchor this amiable sports comedy, released the year after Maris’s landmark 61-dinger season. A Florida boy’s fib to his Little League teammates—that he knows Mantel and Maris—gets out of hand, and leads to him shadowing his idols through spring training, with hilarious results.
Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings

Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings

DIRECTOR: JOHN BADHAM
1976 / 110min / 35mm
This bumptious baseball comedy courtesy of Motown Productions, set in the last years of the Negro League era, features the royalty of Black American screen acting in its starting lineup, including Billy Dee Williams as the Satchel Paige-like pitcher who cooks up a plan to break with penny-pinching management, James Earl Jones as his cerebral slugger foil who goes along with the roadshow, and Richard Pryor as a player plotting to break into the white leagues by masquerading as a Cuban.
Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai

Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai

DIRECTOR: JIM JARMUSCH
1999 / 116min / 35mm
Forest Whitaker’s Ghost Dog isn’t your average Mafia hitman. He’s a devoted bibliophile, follows the samurai code as laid out in Yamamoto Tsunetomo’s Hagakure, and relaxes by tending to his pigeon coop, which you’d be wise not to mess with.
Only Lovers Left Alive

Only Lovers Left Alive

DIRECTOR: JIM JARMUSCH
2013 / 123min / 35mm
How do you keep a love affair alive for a lifetime? For several lifetimes? These are some the questions posed by Jarmusch’s original and seductive interpretation of the vampire movie, in which undead spouses Tilda Swinton and Tom Hiddleston—sometimes together, sometimes apart—have been keeping company for centuries, here seen traveling from Detroit to Tangier.
Down By Law

Down By Law

DIRECTOR: JIM JARMUSCH
1986 / 107min / DCP
Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: A radio DJ (Tom Waits), a small-time pimp (John Lurie), and an oblivious Italian (Roberto Benigni) meet in a New Orleans prison, and wind up on the lam in the bayou, the entire adventure shot in majestic monochrome by the great cinematographer Robby Müller.
The Limits of Control

The Limits of Control

DIRECTOR: JIM JARMUSCH
2009 / 116min / 35mm
For his turn to the espionage thriller, Jarmusch took inspiration from both spaghetti westerns and the lean, mean, sparse prose of Donald Westlake’s Parker novels, written pseudonymously as Richard Stark. Isaach De Bankolé is an operative on an obscure mission in Spain, shot stunningly by frequent and brilliant Wong Kar-wai DP Christopher Doyle, making his way through a string of cryptic meetings en route to an appointment at a fortress-like compound overseen by Bill Murray, in a powerful and sinister role.
Domino

Domino

DIRECTOR: BRIAN DE PALMA
2019 / 89min / DCP
Beginning with a rooftop chase that evokes Hitchcock’s Vertigo, the latest from Brian De Palma plunges Nikolaj Coster-Waldau’s hapless Copenhagan cop into a complex plot involving CIA skullduggery courtesy agent Guy Pearce and high-tech jihadists with machine-gun-mounted livestreaming cameras.
Stranger Than Paradise

Stranger Than Paradise

DIRECTOR: JIM JARMUSCH
1984 / 89min / DCP
Jarmusch announced himself as an independent auteur to watch with this bleakly funny black-and-white comedy played out in single set-ups, long takes, its nonaction set in slow-motion when Hungarian teenager Eszter Balint lands in the Lower East Side apartment of defiantly Americanized layabout cousin John Lurie, who extols the virtues of the TV dinner, and helps her to see the majesty of such exotic locales as Cleveland and Florida.
A Bigger Splash

A Bigger Splash

DIRECTOR: JACK HAZAN
1974 / 106min / DCP
Jack Hazan’s A Bigger Splash (1974) dispenses with drab talking-head portraiture to create an intimate and innovative film about English-born, London-schooled, California-based artist David Hockney and his work that honors its subject through creative risk rather than slavish hagiography.
Battle Royale

Battle Royale

DIRECTOR: KINJI FUKASAKU
2000 / 114min / 35mm
In the dystopian near future, the Japanese government proposes to curb juvenile delinquency through the implementation of an annual death match, in which an entire high school class are dropped on a desert island and given orders to fight to the death until only one remains, all of this overseen by Beat Takeshi Kitano’s military official.
Pee Wee's Big Adventure

Pee Wee's Big Adventure

DIRECTOR: TIM BURTON
1985 / 91min / 35mm
The story of one man-child’s search for his red bicycle, Burton’s more-than-distinctive directorial debut is a rocky road trip studded with wild and weird 1950s-by-way-of-the-1980s Americana, including urban legend-ready truck drivers, rowdy biker gangs, and bigger-than-life tourist trap dinosaurs, all encountered en route to a last stand at the Alamo.
The Plastic Dome of Norma Jean

The Plastic Dome of Norma Jean

DIRECTOR: JULEEN COMPTON
1966 / 82min / 35mm
With her second film, Compton took a dive into magic realism, telling the story of the titular clairvoyance-blessed teenager as she’s first manipulated by an unscrupulous Beatles-esque rock band who want to harness her powers for their own ends, then breaks away to build a fortress of sorts in a huge mail order plastic dome.
Stranded

Stranded

DIRECTOR: JULEEN COMPTON
1965 / 90min / 35mm
Before better-known female-directed narratives of women drop-outs like Barbara Loden’s Wanda and Agnès Varda Vagabond, there was the way-ahead-of-its-time Stranded, the uncompromised independent debut of writer-director-star Compton, who plays a young, sexually liberated American woman traveling Greece with her queer best friend.
Chulas Fronteras + Del Mero Corazón

Chulas Fronteras + Del Mero Corazón

DIRECTOR: LES BLANK
1976 + 1979 / 87min / DCP
Two celebratory films by Les Blank, that most warm, convivial, and richly human of American documentarians, both exploring the wealth of Mexican-American culture by focusing on the famed Norteño and Conjunto musicians of the Mexico-Texas borderlands, the migrant farming communities from which they come, and the social protest ethos inscribed in their music.
The Kid

The Kid

DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
1921 / 68min / 35mm
Regarded as the Tramp’s first jump into feature films, this six-reeler shows Chaplin at his most brilliant and most sentimental, plumbing memories of his own boyhood of almost Dickensian deprivation. The Tramp adopts an abandoned boy, played by soon-to-be-child-superstar Jackie Coogan, and fights against remarkable odds to keep the lad at his side.
Woodstock - The Director's Cut

Woodstock - The Director's Cut

DIRECTOR: MICHAEL WADLEIGH
1969 / 225min / 35mm
A fifty-year-old document that’s as immediate as if it were made yesterday, Wadleigh’s wild and woolly concert film, an Academy Award winner as Best Documentary Feature, puts you right in the thick of the rain-soaked, mud-smeared 400,000-strong celebration that defined a generation.
Like Water for Chocolate

Like Water for Chocolate

DIRECTOR: ALFONSO ARAU
1992 / 105min / DCP
Based on a novel by Laura Esquivel, Alfonso Arau’s seductive, delicious, and enormously charming film is a work of hot-and-heavy magical realism set in a Mexican town circa 1910, where young lovers Tita and Pedro have been forbidden to marry, leading to smoldering unfulfilled desire and inexplicable goings-on in Tita’s kitchen.